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How to decock the Condor SS—-

Home Forums AirForce Condor/Condor SS How to decock the Condor SS—-

This topic contains 50 replies, has 30 voices, and was last updated by  pb0201 1 year, 2 months ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 51 total)
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  • #200197

    mikey
    Member

    That would be great if you could do that Pandemic!

    #200530

    Anonymous

    . edited for PhotoFuckit ransom that I will not pay.

    To remove the anti-dic-cocking device (AKA, the auto safety reset):

    Lower the power wheel setting all the way down.
    Cock the breach (gun).
    Remove the air tank from the gun.
    Remove the tank collar.

    Slide the breach back, you can remove it if you want but it’s not necessary.

    Place the safety in the OFF position.
    De-cock by hold the hammer with a dowel through the breach and de-cock the gun.

    Punch out this pin from the right side only.

    Turn the gun upside down.
    Use the dowel to push the hammer back a little to release the pressure on the device.

    This anti-de-cocking device should fallout, or it may need to be wiggled a bit.

    Reinstall the pin from the left side, this pin is directional and it goes in only one way!
    Cock and de-cock to check.
    Cock the gun and set the safety in the ON position.
    Reinstall the air tank bottle.

    Happy shooting or I should say happier shooting!

    ~ GKU

    p.s. Be careful when removing this anti-dic-cocking device if one forgets to close the breech before firing. Now, it’s kind of like forgetting to pull up your zipper after dic cocking, anti won’t be there anymore to zip it up for you !

    #200566

    mikey
    Member

    Very helpful pictorial GKU.
    Already successfully completed the procedure using your guidance.
    Now here’s a really stupid question from a rookie – what is the procedure for de-cocking once the auto safety reset is removed?
    Thanks
    mikey

    #200899

    bigriver
    Member

    Worked perfectly on my Escape. Moving the hammer back and forth with the dowel didn’t wiggle it free but flicking the safety on and off popped the toggle link right out. Thanks for the information. :biggrinn:

    #208300

    rcmark
    Member

    Worked!!! Thanks

    #208357

    maw
    Member

    Wow, great info, should be a saver!!

    #210617

    shanepheonix
    Member

    Great info! getting to know my new gun. So many great tips on this site :8:

    #210829

    arifgunawan
    Member

    Nice Info…thanks :4:

    #211713

    crosman140
    Member

    You say you can remove the hammer and breech from the rear. I do not see how that is possible as they are longer than the space available to remove them and they will not pass through the rear of the rifle where the tank attaches. How do you do it? Unless it is only possible on the 2013 Airforce rifles.

    #211730

    dougroundup
    Participant

    You must remove the bolt knob and the spinlock/collar nut from the rear of the frame.
    Although many people dislike or question the reasoning of this auto lockup safety, I think that many are missing the main point of such design consideration.
    It isn’t so much the assumption that the operator is incapable of properly manually operating the safety or is negligent in proper operation sequence or decision of deployment, so much so that they’ve deemed it necessary to design auto deployment of the safety.
    Rather it has been designed that way specifically to prevent the existence of the very same mechanical attribute that allows you to uncock the gun in the very first place. The condition that allows the trigger to fully release the hammer and fire the gun with the bolt fully open or not fully closed and full battery. The safety ramifications of this condition and risks, pro vs con and the ability to uncock the weapon, it very well is prudent choice to institute the auto locking safety into the design. Anyone who has experienced “M1 Thumb” from intimate use of the Garand Rifle can likely appreciate the attributes of this mechanical feature! Especially when it is so easy to touch off the trigger when fully seating a heavier pellet into a tighter fitting barrel lead/chambering.
    FWIW… I currently have my auto safety disengaged to allow for decocking.
    Just be careful not to inadvertantly trip the trigger with the breech open!
    NEVER FIRE THE GUN WITH OPEN BREECH
    Be extra cautious whenever objects are within the open breech area such as: YOUR FINGERS when loading and seating a pellet.

    #211747

    crosman140
    Member

    From the picture, I see a set screw in the left side of the frame holding the spinlock collar and it appears to be a 2013 rifle. It appears the spinlock collar is not removable in an older rifle as easy since it does not have this set screw.

    I just looked at a video on the new Air Force rifle and it answered my question. That screw does remove the spin lock assembly on the new rifle and is one of the changes on the new rifle.

    #211770

    dougroundup
    Participant

    Ya know, I had to just think about that and realized, I dont know how the collar is configured on the quick release non-spinlock tank configuration? I have only owned the spinlock style with the ez fill foster fitting style.
    I would assume that it isnt as pertinent here regarding the auto safety engagement when cocking. As these guns are all post 2013 with a newer revised frame to incorporate the newer enhanced trigger and safety fire control group which is different than the old styled frames anyways….
    You are correct, the setscrew is what holds the collar in place.
    Remove the collar and the bolt/breech handle and you should be able to slide the whole innards out the rear, once ya get it past the hammer release sear. (Might require ya to depress the trigger,while the auto safety is tripped or deactivated.)

    #212567

    jca245
    Member

    Hello all. I am a very new ( 2 days) Condor ss owner and I have question about the decoking issue.
    I am familiar with taking things apart and putting them back together; but lets say I do not want to remove this linkage out of my Condor. If the hammer is cocked back, would it damage the hammer assembly to “dry fire” it without the tank ( and top hat valve) installed on the frame? I know that dry firing some guns are not recommended, and firing a springer without a pellet would damage the air chamber, but would this apply to the Condor?
    Sorry if the question seems ignorant. I am trying to find out all I can about this beast I now have in my possession.

    Thank you and take care all.

    #212588

    dougroundup
    Participant

    Damage to the hammer would be unlikely . The breech would be greater likelyhood of damage. The greatest damage possible from firing without a valve present would be an scenerio or event where the whole inner striker assembly just shot out the back of the frame and crashed onto rhe ground. (Spring, hammer, breech) flying outta the back end of the frame. Possible injury too……
    If ya inspect the mechanics of the operation, it will be clearer what happens when there is nothing such as a spinlock bushing, valve body, tophat and tank to terminate the path of travel of internal parts when unsprung.
    Its really much more difficult to describe than to view the overall simplistics of it.
    Anyways , congrats and enjoy your new air rifle . Get out there and start shooting it, soon it will all be old hat as you familiarize yourself it quickly becomes les mysterious.

    #221155

    gan1hck
    Member
    quote dougroundup:

    You must remove the bolt knob and the spinlock/collar nut from the rear of the frame.
    Although many people dislike or question the reasoning of this auto lockup safety, I think that many are missing the main point of such design consideration.
    It isn’t so much the assumption that the operator is incapable of properly manually operating the safety or is negligent in proper operation sequence or decision of deployment, so much so that they’ve deemed it necessary to design auto deployment of the safety.
    Rather it has been designed that way specifically to prevent the existence of the very same mechanical attribute that allows you to uncock the gun in the very first place. The condition that allows the trigger to fully release the hammer and fire the gun with the bolt fully open or not fully closed and full battery. The safety ramifications of this condition and risks, pro vs con and the ability to uncock the weapon, it very well is prudent choice to institute the auto locking safety into the design. Anyone who has experienced “M1 Thumb” from intimate use of the Garand Rifle can likely appreciate the attributes of this mechanical feature! Especially when it is so easy to touch off the trigger when fully seating a heavier pellet into a tighter fitting barrel lead/chambering.
    FWIW… I currently have my auto safety disengaged to allow for decocking.
    Just be careful not to inadvertantly trip the trigger with the breech open!
    NEVER FIRE THE GUN WITH OPEN BREECH
    Be extra cautious whenever objects are within the open breech area such as: YOUR FINGERS when loading and seating a pellet.

    I’ve done that once accidentally when the gun was unloaded…..still don’t know what I was thinking….Have I damaged something?

    thanks

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