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.257 condor ss conversion

Home Forums AirForce Condor/Condor SS .257 condor ss conversion

This topic contains 7 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  Jack 1 week, 4 days ago.

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  • #528386

    Jack
    Participant

    Hello,

    What do I need to do to complete a .257 conversion on a Condor ss? I have the heavy anti slap hammer and heavy spring from Talon tunes. I’d like it to be as beastly as possible.

    Thank you,

    Fred

    #528387

    miksatx
    Participant

    Is all that stuff installed? How about ammo? Are you using a 3000 psi bottle or have you picked up a 580/4500 bottle yet?

    • This reply was modified 2 months, 1 week ago by  miksatx.
    #528408

    anthony266
    Keymaster

    You just need our 257 drop-in barrel..

    .257 Barrel

    #529715

    fomen
    Participant

    I think there’s more to it than just dropping in a barrel. The stock Condor claims to generate 105 FPE. But that’s with everything wide open, and set up for .25 caliber or less. Those are non big bore calibers. You will DEFINITELY need a barrel with a 1-14 twist. That is a FACT! But you will also need an extreme flow valve, a new tophat, a heavier hammer, a heavier spring, and a LOT of tuning. The stock .25 valve assembly just won’t do it for what you want to accomplish. With everything you need to try to accomplish what you want to do, you’re talking about $550-$600. In my opinion, you should just pull the trigger and buy a Texan in .257. It has a 28 inch barrel, an extreme flow valve, side lever cocking, and beefed up hammer and spring. There’s a video on YouTube of a guy who cuts a playing card in half at 300 yards with the .257 Texan after 7 shots. Also, PCP Tunes is making a regulator for the smaller calibers of the Texans. The reg can handle 4500 psi bottle pressure. You can set the valve side of the reg for 3000 psi, and get about a dozen regulated shots at 1000+ FPS, with an extreme spread of 10-12 FPS. The gun can become a TACK DRIVER!

    My buddy has a .257 Condor conversion. It was custom made by Doug Noble. So when I describe the draw backs of converting a Condor vs. buying a Texan, I know what I’m talking about. My buddy bought the Texan after he had everything done on the conversion. At one time, converting the gun was the only option. Buy not anymore. The hammer and spring on the conversion is so heavy that your thumb gets sore after cocking it several times. Plus the hammer hits so violently from the preload that it causes harmonics that equate to issues with accuracy downrange.

    No sir…. Just buy the Texan. Save yourself the headache. Just my $.02

    #529944

    dougroundup
    Participant

    The hammer and spring on the conversion is so heavy that your thumb gets sore after cocking it several times. Plus the hammer hits so violently from the preload that it causes harmonics that equate to issues with accuracy downrange.

    So very true! That is why they mod the frame and use a hammer cocking lever. Which in turns weakend the frame and Doug would stiffen the frame with considerable effort.
    I went to the range spending a full day of shooting and the blister on my thumb was torturous! Shooting with heavy spring and hammer does take a bit more effort. The gun shoots more like a springer. Air gunners that are experienced with springers adopt what is referred to as the “artillery hold” . This works very well when shooting my fully Noble tuned “Dyotat .257” with stock breech cocking lever.
    I have no experience with the Texan but The cocking lever certainly looks very attractive. Shooting .257 slugs is awesome and I would never look back. However it isnt something for everyone and one size does not fit all. I kinda question that a stock Texan is going to have the total tuned performance like the custom built guns utilizing the formula and meticulously massaged like the precision work of airgun machine work of the likes of Doug Noble. Another thing is that the ammo is a very large part of the eqaution and MUST be accurately sized to each insividual barrel. Must everyday casual airgun shooters wont take the added effort to slug a barrel, cast their own bullets from their own molds and sized to within a thou of their slugged diameter of their barrel. Also any .257 barrel will also need to be custom fitted with the proper lead in on the breach side for the particular bullet in use… This is just a few of the nuances that may be overlooked and why I remain doubtful of most production for sale to the general consumer solutions to shooting slugs accurately. Surely there are many big bore slug guns with hunting accuracy. These mimick the ballastics of muzzle loaded black powder arms. For the benchrest prescision you have to work at it and have a deep wallet along with some mechanical and technical skills.
    Welcome to .257 and read up.

    #530179

    fomen
    Participant

    “I kinda question that a stock Texan is going to have the total tuned performance like the custom built guns utilizing the formula and meticulously massaged like the precision work of airgun machine work of the likes of Doug Noble.”

    Yes and no my friend. Doug indeed is a perfectionist. His attention to detail is unparalleled. I’d even go so far as to say that his custom work and the insuing videos displaying it is what initially inspired AF to consider designing a Big Bore model. But the stock AF Texan in .257 is turning out out to be a TACK DRIVER! There’s a video on YouTube of a guy splitting a playing card in half at 300 yards with his .257 Texan. It took 8 or 9 shots. If you watch the video carefully, you will see there is almost zero variance in horizontal parallax on the target. The variance is all in vertical parallax. This indicates the harmonics and twist rate are spot on for the rifle. The reason the vertical parallax shifts is because this is to be expected at 300 yards with a 70+ grain projectile. At 50-100 yards, a difference of 20 FPS is negligible. But at 300 yards, those minute velocity differences will equate to inches. However, the slugs all line up in a perfect horizontal line, indicating there’s zero spin-off or harmonic vibration issues. So their stock barrel choice is perfect. And if the gun was regulated, the horizontal spread at 300 yards would be cut by 60%.

    Don’t shun where small bore air rifles are going. The act of tuning them to shoot slugs is still in it’s infancy. I just bought a .22 caliber, 24″ carbon wrapped, polygon barrel from the Russian Republic with a twist rate of 1:16. This twist rate has been proven to be optimum for .22 caliber projectiles. I’m shooting the 5.52mm slugs from MP-Molds that are designed for air rifles. I’m not shooting large game. I’m shooting medium and small game. I’m also ordering the same style barrel in .25 with a twist of 1:14- also a proven successful twist for that particular caliber. I’d say in 2 years, ALL PCP manufacturers will have at least 1 model designed specifically for shooting slugs. And they will also have an ammo recommendation to pair with it. My hope is that one day, someone at AF will realize that people want the option of shooting slugs in the small bore rifles, and not just the big bores. And they will actually do the R&D and come up with a proven barrel/slug combination that is readily available to the general public. I also wish they would develop a regulator for their rifles. I have 2 regs, but they were bought overseas. They make a HUGE difference however regarding efficiency and accuracy.

    I’ll make sure to keep you guys updated on how the new barrels work out. I’ll go through some different ammo and see who plays the best with my rifle. My goal is 80-85 FPE in .22. This means I’m pushing the 36gr slug from MP-Molds at 1000-1050 fps. I JUST started tuning the gun in anticipation of the new barrel. With my reg set at 160 BAR, and the power wheel set at 2:1 (very low) I’m already pushing the slugs at 930 FPS. But I believe that everything has a resonant frequency. There’s a perfect combo for every air rifle to get it to do what you want it to do. But you may break the bank in the process of finding it. But if I can get 1 MOA or perhaps sub MOA at 100+ yards, I’ll be STOKED! I have a power line that looms ominously at exactly 200 yards from my 2nd story balcony. There’s always a dozen or more pigeons lined up on it. If I could successfully snipe pigeons at that distance, then my quest for that rifle has been completed.

    #530521

    Jack
    Participant

    I have the sho valve and 580 cc bottle ordered. It will arrive soon with the.257 barrel. He just got more. I’m debating a Maddog benchrest stock or the ranger ?

    Thank you,
    Fred

    #530522

    Jack
    Participant

    The slugs and barrels are getting impressive. NEC has the sizes and lead compounds down well. I have a .30 x 700 mm impact barrel and slug liner in my crown now. It’s almost as accurate as firing Mk II’s at 50 yards. haven’t been out at range yet. 85 fpe. It certainly drops rats and squirrels.

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